A Happy New Year to You All

Sunset, Lundy Bay, Polzeath, North Cornwall

Sunset, Lundy Bay, Polzeath, North Cornwall

I hope you had a Great Christmas and can I wish you a very Happy New Year. I will be continuing to post my images to this blog on a regular basis and I look forward to receiving your comments and feedback over the forthcoming year. Your interest in my site is very much appreciated.

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Dusk – Sharrow Point, Whitsand Bay

Dusk, Sharrow Point, Whitsand Bay, Rame Peninsula, South East Cornwall

Dusk, Sharrow Point, Whitsand Bay, Rame Peninsula, South East Cornwall

Taken at high tide when the beach at this location is virtually non-existent. In fact I was penned up in an area about 2 yards square, but nevertheless I was able to take about 20 different images as the sun dipped below the horizon, of which this is one. Hope you like it.

Comments and Retweets are always welcomed and appreciated. Follow me on Twitter at @magiccornwall

Dusk – Helman Tor, Redmoor, Bodmin

Dusk - Helman Tor, Redmoor, Bodmin, Mid Cornwall

Dusk - Helman Tor, Redmoor, Bodmin, Mid Cornwall

This is a sunset picture where the sun does not feature at all. In fact the sun was setting to my right and slightly behind me at the time this picture was taken, but it does illustrate one point and that is that you don’t need the sun to be in the picture to make a good sunset image. If you are out taking pictures of a sunset in a clear sky you may well be disappointed with the results. If the sun hasn’t set yet it will be the brightest object and your cameras meter will try and compensate for that so that the rest of the picture will end up being dark and underexposed, and even then you will get a haloing effect around the sun. The only exception to this would be haze on the horizon which will scatter the light rays and the sun will appear as a red ball, though you may still need to use a graduated ND filter over the sky to balance the light levels. I find that it is best to wait till the sun has dipped below the horizon before firing off frames as you can get some amazing colours. The other alternative is to do as I have done here, and made the image with the camera pointing away from the sun and capturing the reflected colours in the clouds. This is particularly effective with inland sunsets, where there is less light reflected off the land.

Have a go yourself, but don’t forget the most important thing is to have fun !

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Sunset – Lundy Bay, Polzeath

Sunset, Lundy Bay, Polzeath, North Cornwall (David Carvey)

Sunset, Lundy Bay, Polzeath, North Cornwall

Ah Sunsets – aren’t they something special. There’s a magical feeling about this time of day that just lifts your spirits. You can look at them from a couple of different perspectives. From the purely logical and scientific viewpoint it is something that happens every day, it is predictable and the factors that come together to make a colourful sunset are meteorological and happen because a particular set of circumstances have come together at that point in time and at that location. The alternative view is that this is something that is created by an unseen hand, you don’t have to be religious to feel that this event is the work of a higher being. For photographers the last hour before sunset is often termed the ‘Golden Hour’ – it is a time when the light can paint the landscape in glorious colour. Of course sometimes luck will play a part in your ability to capture a magical sunset scene, those same meteorological factors that can make a beautiful sunset can also contrive to ruin it at the crucial moment. The unpredictability of this type of image is the very thing that draws photographers to try and capture it.

You can view many more sunsets (and sunrises) by viewing this Gallery

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Sunset – Perranporth, Mid Cornwall

Sunset, Perranporth, Mid Cornwall (David Carvey)

Sunset, Perranporth, Mid Cornwall

This is Perranporth looking westwards across the beach. The ripples you can see in the foreground are from a stream that runs down the western side of the beach to the sea. Depending on the time of year the amount of water will vary but as it wends its way to the sea it cuts interesting patterns in the sand, which continuously collapse and reform. The sun had dipped below the horizon at this point so the shutter speed was relatively slow and the ripples appear somewhat smoothed out, but I like this effect as it adds an area of interest to the image.

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View more images from my Perranporth Gallery – Click Here